Dr. Tami Petersen, MS, PhD ......Academic Writer, Professor, Researcher, Consultant

As a dedicated practitioner scholar, I believe that the very definition of psychology explains its goal.  We need to understand the mental processes and behavior to use our body's chemistry to learn at our full learning potential.  As a researcher, I believe that bias in some form will always be present, but it is our job to identify it and mitigate.  As a consultant, I help others find thier strengths to create the opportunities that they desire.

My Teaching Philiosophy:

 

Below I will divulge more of my teaching philosophy, but the point is that learning should not hurt.  Teaching should not hurt the instructor.  One thing to note, a topic should not be taught if not completely understood.  I don't mean that the professosr should only be able to cite sources and pass an advanced test showing knowledge.  I am talking about understanding the material.  Living and walking witht he material as a part of life.  

The understanding should be a universal constant for every educator.  As an educator it is important and necessary assimilate the knowledge you have and use it in new and exciting ways.  We should recognize the lessons we teach as they are hapening in life,  It is really good to know what conservation means in Human Develop,emt.  It is better to understand what piaget meant by conservation, and to show archival footage of his experiments so that he can explain conservation as it is happening.  But, if an educator can point out conservation as it is happening in our enviroment, then the lesson was taken to another level of understanding. 

We might film our kids at home after a birthday party. The child has a rule that she can only keep toys that fit into her very large toybox.  Now, that toybox might be overflowing before she brings in her new toys.  The child, using conservation, will assure the parent that the new toys will fit.  She proceeds to empty the toybox and store smaller toys in side the large toys to make addtional room.  She might even stack the toys neatly to make more space.  The child has learned conservation, but it goes further thatn understanding that a bowl and vase can both hold a cup of water and have different levels of the liquid's depth in the different containers.

Life is not a textbook, and we focus so often on the textbook that we miss the magic.  By magic, I mean that we miss seeing and using the knowledge.  It is pure magic to watch someone learn and use the information in a different and more practical setting.  I know that you are thinking , "yeah, who buys 3oo oranges and 76 apples to give away 1/3 for every mile traveled."  But we do learn by using the information gained in real life scenarios.  We learn just as much from a mistake as we do a correct answer.  That is the key are we learning from both our sucesses and 'failures'? Both ends of the stick are just as important as the other.

 

There is no video clip yet

Dr. Tami Petersen, MS, PhD Academic Writer, Professor, Researcher, Consultant.

Teaching Philosophy

As a six year veteran teaching at the collegiate level, I have a solid teaching philosophy.  My philosophy is simple for anyone who understands psychology.  Entering the field of psychology as an undergraduate and then as a graduate student, I was so focused on actually learning the material that I did not first notice the connection between learning and psychology.  Psychology by definition is the study of behaviorism and cognition.  That is the definition of psychology, and when a student opens any introduction to psychology book, the student reads that psychology is the study of behavior and mental processes.   

Behaviorism has been a natural part of my life from the beginning, because my father worked under B.F.Skinner.  Dr. Skinner taught him everything he knew about behaviorism, as a directive of the US ARMY.  As a result, I have a unique way of looking at everything.  I have been groomed to teach from birth.  I also understand behaviorism, cognitive psychology, and biological psychology as they pertain to learning.   

I teach my students to use their bodies to create and pair associations.  This approach is more classical than operant.  It has been established that when using our bodies to create the correct neurotransmitters at the right time, paired with self-reference, that true learning can and does occur.  My track record at State College of Florida indicates that I have a positive influence on my students and their grade point averages in my class and successive classes.  I do have more A’s than most instructors, but I make them learn.  Not only learn, but use the information that they have gained to reinforce the paired association.  They use the information in my classes to demonstrate that they understand the concepts.   

Life is not a bubble test.  My teaching philosophy is simple, as Dr. Skinner has said to many colleagues, keep it simple (KISS).  Learning should occur naturally and not hurt.  In early development children learn using this method and they learn more in five years than they will in any other time of their life.  That is because they are pairing associations.  I simply teach my students to learn how to use a skill that they already have mastered.  Learning is a natural process.

  • Exciting Changes in Learning and Education

    Abstract from forthcoming journal article highlighting educational and societal changes:

    A sense of belonging facilitates better decision making and better interpersonal relationships, and Kim and Irwin (2013) suggest that this is an innate need for human development, this leading back to the complementary theories of evolution and social identity. Trends continue to seek the negative outcomes of ostracism with Purdue University leading the way with the most aggressive platform for research, although this study did suggest the need for more research about positive outcomes (Oaten et al., 2008). Belonging increases functionality in the groups, and it is suggested that belongingness increases worker productivity and strengthens interpersonal relationships; and belonging has strong ties to a shared socioeconomic level and status of the group, as indicated by two middle adults and one young adult participant. Differences and consistencies were not as noticeable until age groups were considered as a possible method of dividing the participants into sub-groups. The participants were divided into three groups of young, middle, and senior adults; using ages as to separate these sub-groups. Patterns in attitude and perception were discernable when age was a factor. The experience of exclusion was not desirable by any group or participant. Neoliberalism is described as a conceptual framework to describe how individuals use their own resources to make decisions without the immediate need for others. This is a term that has been used to represent “a deep restructuring of the cultural, social, political, and economic” boundaries of group membership over the last decade (Jaffe & Quark, 2006, p. 207). These boundaries are suggesting that with technological advances younger generations and advantaged students are best equipped to break the within-group barrier (Adams, 2014).

  • Generation Z is a Game Changer

    After the Millennials we have Generation Z. Generation Z is being raised by Milleniials and are the second generation to have always known technology as a cultural norm.

    Abstract from forthcoming journal article highlighting educational and societal changes:

    A sense of belonging facilitates better decision making and better interpersonal relationships, and Kim and Irwin (2013) suggest that this is an innate need for human development, this leading back to the complementary theories of evolution and social identity. Trends continue to seek the negative outcomes of ostracism with Purdue University leading the way with the most aggressive platform for research, although this study did suggest the need for more research about positive outcomes (Oaten et al., 2008). Belonging increases functionality in the groups, and it is suggested that belongingness increases worker productivity and strengthens interpersonal relationships; and belonging has strong ties to a shared socioeconomic level and status of the group, as indicated by two middle adults and one young adult participant. Differences and consistencies were not as noticeable until age groups were considered as a possible method of dividing the participants into sub-groups. The participants were divided into three groups of young, middle, and senior adults; using ages as to separate these sub-groups. Patterns in attitude and perception were discernable when age was a factor. The experience of exclusion was not desirable by any group or participant. Neoliberalism is described as a conceptual framework to describe how individuals use their own resources to make decisions without the immediate need for others. This is a term that has been used to represent “a deep restructuring of the cultural, social, political, and economic” boundaries of group membership over the last decade (Jaffe & Quark, 2006, p. 207). These boundaries are suggesting that with technological advances younger generations and advantaged students are best equipped to break the within-group barrier (Adams, 2014).

  • Research Keeps Our Minds Fresh and Open to Discovery: Thoughts on the Case Study

    Abstract from forthcoming journal article highlighting educational and societal changes:

    Research concepts and methodology are dependent upon the research question (Lidén, 2013). The research question for a case study often asks for descriptions of experiences. Lidén (2013) suggests that the research question directs the choice of methodology, data collection, and analysis. “Descriptions of experiences” does indicate that a case study would be an appropriate research design choice (Yin, 2014). A fellow researcher has stated, "when data were collected, themes emerged, and similar describing characteristics of smaller elements of data fell into the categories of the emergent themes" (Della Rosa et al., 2014; Anna Jorgensen, personal communication, January 10, 2016). biases, which should be considered for every study. Case studies are inductive, implying that the information gained is not deduced but constructed by the researcher from the data collected (Kemp & Jern, 2014). The single case study is a very specific inquiry, with a certain population or a group from a unique area; suggesting that even when quantitative data are used, generalizations on a broad scale are hard to justify (Lin, Yin, & Loubere, 2014). Qualitative studies have no generalizations and only seek the possibility of transparency. Examples of a good study design would include triangulating data, transparency, confidentiality, ethical concerns, remaining in design boundaries, and a good literature review, all of which occurred during this study seeking the experiences of exclusion (Gammon, Strand, & Eng, 2014; Ruokonen & Ruismäki, 2013).

Honor Society Member